Water

 

Concerned with the long-term effects of drought and the Texas Water Development Board’s projection that municipal water demand will double as the population of Texas doubles over the next 50 years, NexusHaus focuses on water conservation, treatment, and reuse.

Diagrams_Water1

To reduce reliance on city water, NexusHaus will capture rainwater to provide all of its potable water needs and will only be connected to the city supply by a small refill line. The minimal supply from the city will serve as a backup during long dry spells. This potable rainwater harvesting system minimizes added stress to the region’s water supplies and minimizes the additional load of more residents on the existing neighborhood water and wastewater infrastructure while increasing density in the city. Additionally, the on-site treatment system avoids the water losses along the municipal distribution system by approximately 10 percent, and the thermal storage tank acts as a secondary storage volume for rainwater, giving the system additional capacity while also providing beneficial load shifting.

Diagrams_Water2

In addition to providing potable water for the home, NexusHaus’ integrated rainwater thermal storage system shifts cooling off peak to low-demand nighttime hours while reducing storm water runoff which taxes the aging infrastructure in the City of Austin.

Water Systems Diagram

 

For more information about the NexusHaus concepts, select one of the icons below:

Energy

Food

Density

Comments (2 Responses)

  1. I am a developer in Park City, UT and a small but highly visible project in Old Town in Park City (you can also see our project on Facebook under Echo Spur). Our first two homes are targeted for a 20 HERS Index and we have taken advantage of the recent change in Utah laws to allow 2,500 gallon underground water cisterns. Our flat roof (which is also a Green Roof) allows the home to efficiently capture rain and snowmelt. However, we are only using the cistern to irrigate the Green Roof and surrounding landscaping; it is not being treated to allow it to be potable. Additionally, we are not capturing any greywater. I’d like to hear more about how you’ve engineered your water management system. Please contact me at my email address, best regards,

    Sean Kelleher

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